CDC 4 Formulating Goals and Objectives

Christina, Thanks for this very nice CDC. I have made some comments below. One thing that may seem minor is I suggest you use “Students will be able to” in each objective.  It is what curriculum developers are used to seeing. I am not sure that is a good enough reason, but I still suggest you follow that convention. Again, thanks for this. best, steve c.

Sixth Grade mixed level ESL, Bronx, NY

Goal 1: By the end of the year, students will be able to write for varying tasks such as informational, responding to literature, and expression through opinion writings, narratives and poetry.

Objectives

1a: Students will recognize features of different types of writing. How will you measure this/know they can do this? (Recognize is a verb Bloom uses but I wonder how we will know this is occurring?)

1b: Students will work to be able to write using the basic conventions and features of American English using appropriate grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and intonation. Although it is nuanced, “being able to” is different than working to (or trying to).

1c: Students will be able to develop ideas through supporting details.

1d: Students will use tier two vocabulary to improve word choice.

1e: Students will be able to reflect on their own writing to make improvements. It may seem nitpicky but I’d add “in journal entries” to make this very clear.

Goal 2: By the end of the year, students will be able to listen and comprehend information spoken in varying context.

Objectives

2a: Students will be able to use phrases to ask for clarification when necessary to show self-monitoring.

2b: Students will be able to provide responses using accountable talk to show agreement, disagreement, and additions to a previous speaker. What do you mean by “accountable talk?”

2c: Students will be able to listen to identify the main idea and key details.

Goal 3: By the end of the year, students will be able to interact with grade level texts.

Objectives:

3a: Students will use varying strategies to make meaning of complex texts, including strategies for clarifying unfamiliar words, self monitoring strategies, and comprehension strategies.

3b: Students will be able to analyze a grade level text for an author’s purpose.

3c: Students will be able to identify literary elements in a text.

3d: Students will show an appreciation of literature through independent reading of self-selected books. Affective objectives are always difficult to measure…how will they show this?

Goal 4: By the end of the year, students will be able to speak on a variety of academic and nonacademic topics.

Objectives:

4a: Students will be able to use work to speak using the basic conventions and features of American English using appropriate grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and intonation.

4b: Students will be able to hold conversations on academic topics, as well as informally.

4c: Students will be able tofollow the rules for turn taking and holding an academic conversation.

4d: Students will be able to incorporate new vocabulary while speaking.

4e: Students will be able to use accountable talk while speaking to show agreement, disagreement, expand on another’s ideas, or ask for clarification.

4f: Students will be able to present information to the class.

Goal : By the end of the year, students will be able to demonstrate and understanding of cross-cultural knowledge.

Objectives:

5a: Students will be able to articulate aspects of their own culture that make them unique.

5b: Students will be able to identify cultural differences between living in the U.S. and their previous home.

5c: Students will be able to conduct research their own culture, as well as the cultures of others.

5d: Students will be able to demonstrate in writing what makes them unique in varying ways throughout the year.

4 thoughts on “CDC 4 Formulating Goals and Objectives

  1. Christina,

    I loved reading yours because your situation is so similar to mine. I think it’s great that you specify, ” at grade level” “American English” and living in the US. Like Marilyn’s I like that you specified, by when they should learn their objectives.

  2. Christina,

    Such great goals and objectives every single one. Since I began volunteering, I have been so intrigued with planning and activities for learners who are at mixed levels. Was it hard for you to come up with these goals and objectives because of that? THe cross cultural knowledge goal is so interesting. Students always enjoy learning about different places and cultures. Great goals and objectives.

  3. Hi Christina,
    I apologize for responding so late.

    Had I not known that we are all ESL teachers and for your fifth set of goals and objectives for your course, this set would probably feel at home in a general English language arts class. A lot of these objectives sound similar to the ones my Eighth grade English teach had us fulfill. On top of that, I myself, can easily see how lessons can be planed out to achieve many of the goals and their accompanying objectives here.

    Outside of the age difference and levels of our students, I have used poetry in my ESL class. I think that, with the right approach, poetry and other forms of literature as well can have a natural home in the ESL classroom.

    Do your students also have to take the NYSESLAT exam? How much does that form of assessment, or another form in general, play a role in the class?

    • The students have to take the NYSESLAT exam, and to be honest it does not have a huge role in determining what is taught or how. Toward test time, we work a little on the types of questions and what they earn points for, however the test seems a little strange and I am always surprised about what is on it. The test that plays a bigger role is the New York State exam. A lot of techniques for answer short answer questions, and the kinds of texts students interact with are more similar to this test.

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