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Scientific innovations harness noise and acoustics for healing

Scientific innovations harness noise and acoustics for healing

Today, the role of sound in science extends beyond the range of audible frequencies: Ultrasonic and other silent acoustic waves have made their way into researchers’ repertoire, helping them push the boundaries of conventional medicine and research.
In examples from four Stanford labs, scientists are investigating the full spectrum, harnessing the nuances of noise and the power of acoustics to generate inventive, if not unexpected, technologies that show just how potent the combination of sound and science can be.

Dear Architects: Sound Matters

[et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="4.10.5" _module_preset="default"][et_pb_row _builder_version="4.10.5" _module_preset="default" custom_padding="||0px|||"][et_pb_column _builder_version="4.10.5" _module_preset="default" type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="4.10.5" _module_preset="default" hover_enabled="0" sticky_enabled="0"]Dear Architects: Sound MattersBy MICHAEL KIMMELMAN December…
Sound and Plants

Sound and Plants

Believe it or not, there’s a long history of plants and sound.
Here’s an article in the great art blog Hyperallergic that talks about the exhibition Sonic Succulents: Plant Sounds and Vibrations by Adrienne Adar at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden

Anke Eckardt’s GROUND

Anke Eckardt’s GROUND

The ground is in motion. GROUND acts as a LOOKING GLASS, as an AMPLIFIER for what we normally can´t perceive – tectonic plates are continously shifting … the permutations of landscapes constitute an infinite process of becoming… geosphere is a complex system that interferes with biosphere but also with anthroposphere, that part of the environment, that is made and modified by humans.

GROUND is moved by immense mechanical forces. The motion can be felt, heard and seen. Rough sounds are mechanically produced through friction between the concrete elements … visitors might experience the loss of their visual reference points, it becomes unclear what is still and what isn´t… there is an afterglow of a moving ground in the visitors physical memory after leaving the installation.

Doug Aitken – Sonic Pavillion

Doug Aitken – Sonic Pavillion

The idea behind Sonic Pavilion (2009) was this: boring of a 200-meter-deep well in the ground in order to install a set of microphones to capture the sound of the earth. By way of a sophisticated system of equalization and amplification, this sound is played in real time inside the empty circular pavilion, which was designed to create equivalence between the audio experience and one’s relation to the surrounding space.

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