Museum Visit for Studio

Crown Of The Virgin Immaculate Conception

Colombias 1600

This crown was made for the Virgin Immaculate Conception, it was most likely made to honor her and show her superiority.

This was made in Colombia and made from gold and emeralds. Gold was chosen because it is the most precious and expensive metal and emeralds are also rare and beautiful

This came from centuries of making crowns and crowns being show in religious figures.

Crowns are a symbolic headgear that represents power, glory, immortality, and sovereignty. (1) It was made to for a Virgin which is a religious person in the Catholic religion. This crown was not made to be worn technically because it was made for the virgin who does not live on Earth. The wearability for a regular person however is not very functional due to the weight, height and small appearing hole at the bottom. This crown was made to be looked at rather than worn.

1.http://www.historyofhats.net/headgear-history/history-of-crowns/

 

Louis Comfort Tiffany/ Tiffany & CO

Necklace with Moonstones

New York 1910

This item was donated to the Met by Susan Dwight Bliss (1) who was a collector at the time. (2) She came from a wealthy background and so did the people who purchased this high class jewelry.

This item was made in Tiffany & CO in New York City. It was made from moonstones, sapphires, platinum (1).  Moonstones are used because they are believed to have healing properties and they are beautiful stones that shift colors. (3) The sapphires go around the stones and are all held together with platinum, all precious materials.

This necklace came from the ages before of neck adornment transformed to fit within the high class society of New York City in the early 1900s.

The materials used in this piece were made to be elegant and stunning. It is made to be worn on elegant occasions due to its size and design. It appears to be quite heavy and sturdy. It is meant to be worn by people in high class society.

1.https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/5405

2.https://blogs.princeton.edu/rarebooks/2009/04/susan-dwight-bliss-1882-1966-c/

3.https://www.thespruce.com/what-is-the-meaning-of-moonstone-1274360

Cartier (French, founded Paris, 1847) (1)

 London, 1928

This item was meant to be worn by a wealthy person and is very valuable. This item was donated by the the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History (1)

 This necklace was made in London from natural pearls, diamonds, and platinum. (1) Pearls are a symbol of beauty and purity.(2) This necklace was made to be elegant and beautiful.

This necklace evolved from the use of pearls in neck adornments throughout history.

This necklace was so simply and beautiful, it caught my attention in a matter of seconds. It is very elegant and timeless. It is a very feminine necklace fitting for the society at the time. The materials are fairly light making it wearable and functional for a night out.

1.https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/712128?exhibitionId=%7b1d438e61-70fc-4d26-bfd8-ed586f42f273%7d&oid=712128&pkgids=531&pg=0&rpp=20&pos=58&ft=*&offset=20

2.https://www.americangemsociety.org/page/pearls

Jewelry

Louis Comfort Tiffany/ Tiffany & CO

Necklace with Moonstones, Sapphires and Platinum

New York 1910

Art

Ice Floes

1893

Monet

Oil on Canvas

Both of these pieces have similar colors. In the Monet painting, the blues, whites and hidden colors play together to create a sense of ice and fogginess. At the same time, the moonstones in the necklace play with color in a similar way. The color is not set for these stones and when it catches light it seems to have the same colors as the painting. Both give of an icy look and when seen side by side, the similarities are noteable.

 

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