Posts Tagged "sensorium"

Sugandha Gupta – Sensory Textiles

Sugandha Gupta – Sensory Textiles

Parsons faculty Sugandha Gupta is a textile artist and maker who emphasizes the need to engage through the senses. She believes in discovering her strengths in her senses by working with her hands using a variety of different techniques and materials. She uses natural fibers such as paper, silk, cotton , cords, wool and transforms them by manipulating the materials.  She creates  a variety of textures and adds scents as well as sounds to create an immersive and evocative experience for her audience. Her work exist between the realms of art and design and carries a message of inclusion in society.

Bohyun Yoon – Glass, Sound, Interaction

 The artist: “I saw great potential in one of the attributes of glass, its ability to resonate sound, and developed a musical instrument, “Glass Helmet Instrument”. It operates similarly to wine glass playing where sound is produced by rubbing around the rim of a wine glass.  I wanted to further develop it as a prosthetic device, which can also function as an extension of one’s body that enhances certain activity such as communication or interaction.

The Senses – Design Beyond Vision

The Senses – Design Beyond Vision

Sensory design recognizes that we understand and navigate the world with all five of our senses. Organized into nine thematic sections, The Senses demonstrates that by opening up to multiple sensory dimensions, designers reach a greater diversity of users.

Tate Sensorium

Tate Sensorium

LeftRight

Galleries are overwhelmingly visual. But people are not – the brain understands the world by combining what it receives from all five senses. Can taste, touch, smell and sound change the way we ‘see’ art?

Chris Salter – Displace 2.0

Chris Salter – Displace 2.0

Displace 2.0 puts sensory experience in the foreground. Groups of visitors progress through the three floors of the space, encountering a series of environments and experience sensory actions that intermingle the senses of smell, taste, sight, sound and touch. At first, these sensory modalities are separated from each other, but grow over time to cause intense, almost hallucinatory sensations merging to a point of pure saturation.

What does color smell like?

What does color smell like?

That color and smell have a sensory connection is long-established, but there’s debate about whether associating the smell of strawberries with red or smoke with black is something structured in our brains, based in language, or resulting from experience. A study published this week in the peer-reviewed, open-access PLoS One called “Cross-Cultural Color-Odor Associations” suggests it may be cultural.

Drinking In the Art: Museums Offer a Growing Banquet for the Senses

Drinking In the Art: Museums Offer a Growing Banquet for the Senses

As visitors strolled through a recent display of Madame de Pompadour’s coffee grinder, an 1840s Sèvres porcelain coffee set, tea canisters, sugar bowls and other European decorative arts at the Detroit Institute of Arts, the scent of roasted coffee beans arose in one room. Bach’s “Coffee” Cantata played in the background.

Does music change the taste of wine?

Does music change the taste of wine?

Let’s be blunt: The tongue is really dumb. Unlike the rest of our sensory organs, which are exquisitely sensitive, that lump of exposed muscle sitting in the mouth is a crude perceptual device, able to only detect five different taste sensations. (Your cochlea, in contrast, contains thousands of different hair cells, each of which is tuned to particular wavelengths of sound.)

Sam Taylor-Johnson: Biological Time and decay

Sam Taylor-Johnson: Biological Time and decay

Originally a sculptor, Sam Taylor-Johnson began working in photography, film, and video in the early 1990s. The split between being and appearance in situations where the line between interior and external sense of self is in conflict – has always been in the centre of her creative work.

Onformative – The body bursting space and time

The basic idea of the project is built upon the consideration of creating a moving sculpture from the recorded motion data of a real person. For our work we asked a dancer to visualize a musical piece (Kreukeltape by Machinenfabriek) as closely as possible by movements of her body.

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