Urban Adaptation- Process

In the original drawing of my garment, I designed a hoop skirt. I decided to make it out of thick wire and wrap it in something to disguise the metal. After I built it, the metal looked really cool by itself and gave the outfit a new edge, so I decided to keep it rather than ruin it by wrapping it in something like colored scotch tape. However, when I was close to being finished with my garment, I put on the final plastic layer of the skirt, and the hoop skirt became unnoticeable. At the same time, I was playing with some canvas to try and tie the plastic layer together. I came up with the idea to wrap the wire loosely in strips of canvas. I made it look purposefully twisted and messy. It made the wire lines bigger and it fit well with the overall feel of my dress, since it wasn’t meant to be edgy. Below are before and after pictures of the hoop skirt:

Before

After

Urban Adaptation- Process

I started to actually build my garment. I already knew that I wanted to make a skirt out of umbrellas. I had one white and one red umbrella, both of which I had already deconstructed in order to separate the patterned fabric from the handle. Originally, I had planned to use the red umbrella as the top of the skirt, and the white umbrella as the bottom. The material of the umbrellas was thin, so I would have had to make shorts or another skirt to go under it. However, while I was making the skirt, I arranged the umbrellas how I envisioned, and I did not like them together. The skirt was too long, and I thought that the red drew too much attention. Therefore, I came up with the solution to layer the white umbrella over the red umbrella. This made the skirt shorter, the white umbrella looked better on top, and with two layers of material the skirt was no longer see-through, so it solved the problem of me having to come up with shorts to go underneath.

Material Alphabet

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My first project in Parsons Design Studio involved creating my own typeface using 3-D objects. Each student was given one word to inspire his/her alphabet. I received the word, “Symmetry.” I immediately thought of mirrors and reflections. I wanted the overall design to be very clean and linear. We were given about 30 minutes to grab the supplies we needed to build the alphabet. I grabbed flat wooden sticks and a roll of thin, reflective metal. I decided my design would be to split the symmetrical letters in half and put an axis of symmetry down the middle using the metal. I made the letters out of the sticks. As I was creating my alphabet, I began thinking. about positive and negative space, and I decided to use three wooden sticks to signify one line in a letter. This way, the letter would take up more space on the page as the main object. One of my finished letters is shown below:

 

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