Posts Tagged "sound and culture"

Ultra-Red Five – Five Protocols for Listening

Ultra-Red Five – Five Protocols for Listening

In honor of May Day, Ultra-red release the PDF of our latest workbook for militant sound inquiry, “Five Protocols for Organized Listening” (5.8MB). The workbook compiles protocols for collective listening developed by multiple teams of investigators from 2009 to 2011 in cities across North America and Europe. “Five Protocols” is also accompanied by links to related sound objects on the School of Echoes Soundcloud page. Please feel free to download and distribute. We only ask that you send us feedback on your experiments with organized listening and militant sound investigation.

Hong-Kai Wang

Hong-Kai Wang

Hong-Kai Wang is an artist who works mainly with sound. Her practice includes processes involved in the production and performance of sound as well as their political and social contexts, and, not least, the organisation of listening. In several of her pieces she has employed collective processes, discussions and workshops.

John Oswald – Plunderphonic mashups

John Oswald – Plunderphonic mashups

John Oswald’s piece de resistance. Twenty minutes of some of the most insane editing, cross-fading, beat matching, cultural name dropping and sampling. No other work even comes close to the intensity of Plexure. John Oswald proves he is a virtuoso of Pro Tools, over a thousand different artists edited, spliced and mixed together.

The History of Sound Art (recording with timeline)

An engaging sound collage presenting an unique historical documentation of Sound Art from the early 20th century to present day. The composition weaves through different sound works throughout the century with narratives and ideas from some of the prominent artists in the field.

Behaves So Strangely

Behaves So Strangely

For those of us who have trouble staying in tune when we sing, Deutsch has some exciting news. The problem might not be your ears, but your language. She tells us about tone languages, such as Mandarin and Vietnamese, which rely on pitch to convey the meaning of a word. Turns out speakers of tone languages are exponentially more inclined to have absolute (AKA ‘perfect’) pitch. And, nope, English isn’t one of them. 

Musical Illusions

Musical Illusions

Ready to hear some trippy stuff? Check out these audio illusions from Diana Deutsch (of Sometimes Behaves So Strangely fame).…
So you want to talk about squid?

So you want to talk about squid?

Here's a good example of the way that language can be manipulated to tweak intelligibility and meaning. [audio m4a="https://portfolio.newschool.edu/sound/files/2016/09/allaboutsquid-yleno4.m4a"][/audio] All About…
Furniture Music – Erik Satie

Furniture Music – Erik Satie

[et_pb_section bb_built="1"][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.21.4" z_index_tablet="500"] In the midst of an art opening at a Paris gallery in 1902, Ambient music…
Sound and Cities

Sound and Cities

The sounds of our lives suck! How to make cities better by ending the blight of noiseBad sound is "as…
Listen to Wikipedia

Listen to Wikipedia

Listen to the sound of Wikipedia's recent changes feed. Bells indicate additions and string plucks indicate subtractions. Pitch changes according…
Digital Empathy

Digital Empathy

Digital Empathy greets High Line visitors with a variety of messages. At some sites, computer-generated voices speak messages of concern,…
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