Physiology – The Body

Scientific innovations harness noise and acoustics for healing

Scientific innovations harness noise and acoustics for healing

Today, the role of sound in science extends beyond the range of audible frequencies: Ultrasonic and other silent acoustic waves have made their way into researchers’ repertoire, helping them push the boundaries of conventional medicine and research.
In examples from four Stanford labs, scientists are investigating the full spectrum, harnessing the nuances of noise and the power of acoustics to generate inventive, if not unexpected, technologies that show just how potent the combination of sound and science can be.

Planeta Abuelx – Guadalupe Maravilla

Planeta Abuelx – Guadalupe Maravilla

Through Totemic Sculptures and Sound Art, Guadalupe Maravilla Explores the Therapeutic Power of Indigenous Ritual. Maravilla works across painting, sculpture, and sound-based performances all veiled with autobiography, whether informed by the Mayan architecture and stone totems that surrounded him as a child or his cancer diagnosis as a young adult. His pieces are predominately therapeutic and rooted in Indigenous ritual and mythology,

Onyx Ashanti

Onyx Ashanti

Onyx Ashanti is a Berlin-based artist who fuses electronic, free-jazz, and science fiction, creating live performances with instruments he invented.

Trevor Wishart – Red Bird: A Political Prisoner’s Dream

Trevor Wishart – Red Bird: A Political Prisoner’s Dream

 “Red Bird” (1977) is a 45-minute piece of musique concrète in four movements. Made for the most part of bird sounds, body sounds, and selected mouthed words, it weaves an intricate network of symbols. Completed in 1977, it was made with traditional electro-acoustic techniques.

Anna Mlasowsky – Glass and Sound

Anna Mlasowsky – Glass and Sound

Anna Mlasowsky is a German-born glass artist who works across many media including video, installation, and performance. As the description below for the project “Resonance” attests, her work with sound emerges from her own challenges with hearing perception.

Feeling Music – artists exploring the physical impact of sound

Feeling Music – artists exploring the physical impact of sound

Humans come into contact with sound all the time. Our first tactile listening experience is in the womb, feeling our mother’s heartbeat. This kind of physicality continues into our everyday: We feel our own hearts beating, we hear the sound of our footsteps. By its very nature, direct contact with music through its natural vibrations introduces us to an experience we’ve been missing, one that is crucial to our proper understanding of it.

Anke Eckardt’s GROUND

Anke Eckardt’s GROUND

The ground is in motion. GROUND acts as a LOOKING GLASS, as an AMPLIFIER for what we normally can´t perceive – tectonic plates are continously shifting … the permutations of landscapes constitute an infinite process of becoming… geosphere is a complex system that interferes with biosphere but also with anthroposphere, that part of the environment, that is made and modified by humans.

GROUND is moved by immense mechanical forces. The motion can be felt, heard and seen. Rough sounds are mechanically produced through friction between the concrete elements … visitors might experience the loss of their visual reference points, it becomes unclear what is still and what isn´t… there is an afterglow of a moving ground in the visitors physical memory after leaving the installation.

Audible Spaces: Exhibition explores physicality of sound

Audible Spaces: Exhibition explores physicality of sound

Audible Spaces presents three sound installations that encourage participants to explore the subtleties of listening. Tristan Perich, Zarouhie Abdalian, and [The User] have each created immersive environments using seemingly uniform sounds that dissolve into tonal, tactile, and temporal variations as participants engage with them.

Marco Fusinato – Constellations

Marco Fusinato – Constellations

A 40-metre wall with a 1.5-metre gap at each end is built to bisect the gallery. Hidden
inside the wall are a series of microphones connected to a PA system. The entrance side of the gallery is empty. On the other side of the gallery, coming out from the bisecting wall a baseball bat is attached to a steel chain. The audience is invited to strike the wall. Their action is amplified at 120db.

Maryanne Amacher: Sound, Body, Space

Maryanne Amacher: Sound, Body, Space

Maryanne Amacher was an experimental sound artist who composed music and created site-specific sound installations. Early in her career she played music on multiple tape machines and mixed them live. She was interested in the experience and perception of sounds in particular spaces.

Tony Oursler: Imponderable

Tony Oursler: Imponderable

Tony Oursler’s Imponderable (2015–16) offers an alternative depiction of modernism that reveals the intersection of technological advancements and occult phenomena…
Behaves So Strangely

Behaves So Strangely

For those of us who have trouble staying in tune when we sing, Deutsch has some exciting news. The problem might not be your ears, but your language. She tells us about tone languages, such as Mandarin and Vietnamese, which rely on pitch to convey the meaning of a word. Turns out speakers of tone languages are exponentially more inclined to have absolute (AKA ‘perfect’) pitch. And, nope, English isn’t one of them. 

Musical Illusions

Musical Illusions

Ready to hear some trippy stuff? Check out these audio illusions from Diana Deutsch (of Sometimes Behaves So Strangely fame).…

Tremulously I stand in the subways, absorbed into the terrible reverberations of exploding energy. Fearful, I touch the forest of steel girders loud with the thunder of oncoming trains that shoot past me like projectiles. InertI stand, riveted in my place. My limbs, paralyzed, refuse to obey the will insistent on haste to board the train while the lightning steed…

– Helen Keller – From My Later Life

Virtual haircut

Ok besides the incredibly campy delivery in this demonstration, it is a great example of the power of stereo imaging…
Tactile Transducers

Tactile Transducers

Also known as Surface Transducers and other things... https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10975 "Surface transducers give you the awesome power to turn almost any…
Vox Humana: Alfred Wolfsohn’s Experiments in Extension of Human Vocal Range

Vox Humana: Alfred Wolfsohn’s Experiments in Extension of Human Vocal Range

[et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="3.0.47" custom_padding="0|0px|23.5938px|0px|false|false"][et_pb_row custom_padding="0|0px|11.7969px|0px|false|false" _builder_version="3.0.48" background_size="initial" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="3.0.47"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.21.4" custom_padding="0px|20px|20px|20px" z_index_tablet="500"]Have you ever considered what the full…

Henri Chopin – Throat Power

[et_pb_section fb_built="1" _builder_version="3.0.47" custom_padding="0|0px|23.5938px|0px|false|false"][et_pb_row _builder_version="3.0.48" background_size="initial" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" custom_padding="0|0px|11.7969px|0px|false|false"][et_pb_column type="4_4" _builder_version="3.0.47"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.21.4" custom_margin="0px|||" custom_padding="0px|||" z_index_tablet="500"]Sound poet Henri Chopin's work asks…
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